University of Idaho Research and Extension Center receives 100 year award as a Cooperative Weather Observer

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Randy Gamble accepted, on behalf of the University of Idaho’s Aberdeen Research and Extension Center, the 100-year Institution Length-of-Service Award. Gamble, the current observer of record, shares observing duties with nine other members of staff – Alan Summers, Zak Copeland, Dave Sorenson, Ramon Calzada, Rose Elguezabal, Les Howell, Kevin Park, Juan Torres and Javier Uribe. This ensures a continuous, uninterrupted, set of agricultural observations, totaling nearly 37,000 observations since their record-taking began.

The first recorded observations began with the sites opening in January 1912. The Weather Bureau, now the National Weather Service, recognized the value of these observations and invited them into the National Cooperative Weather Observing Program. These observations began on April 1, 1914.

This unselfish and dedicated service in weather observing and weather record keeping for the community of Aberdeen and the National Weather Service provides valuable climatic information for the State of Idaho and the nation. The University of Idaho’s Aberdeen Experimental Station received their award on Wednesday, Aug. 6. It was presented by Gary Wicklund, National Weather Service Observation Program Leader. Karrie Shmidt was also present from the National Weather Service in Pocatello.

Across southeastern Idaho and northern Utah, nearly 60 volunteer weather observers provide valuable weather reports fundamental in assisting the National Weather Service (NWS), a division of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, to more accurately predict the climate of the region. The Experimental Station is among an elite group of people contributing their time to accurately collect weather information used in NWS climate forecasts. These superbly dedicated people are part of the National Weather Service’s Cooperative program of nearly 11,000 volunteers.

NOAA (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration) dedicates itself to enhancing economic security, national safety via prediction and research of weather and climate-related events, and by providing environmental stewardship of our nation’s coastal and marine resources. Through the emerging Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS), NOAA works with its federal partners, more than 60 countries and the European Commission, to develop a global monitoring network to predict future climate affects and then protect the planet it observes.

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